Curriculum review and initial Government response released

Media Release
  • Minister for Education
  • Leader of the House

The Australian Government has today released the Review of the Australian Curriculum.

The Government has also released an Initial Australian Government Response as a starting point for discussions with states and territories and other key stakeholders on how to strengthen and refine the Australian Curriculum.

The Minister for Education, the Hon Christopher Pyne MP, will take the Review and the Initial Australian Government Response to the Education Council of state and territory education ministers in December for consideration.

The Government’s Initial Response focusses on five key themes of the Review:

  • addressing the identified concerns of an overcrowded curriculum;
  • improving parental engagement around the curriculum;
  • improving accessibility for all students – particularly those with disability;
  • rebalancing the curriculum – ensuring that a range of views are taught; and
  • reviewing the governance of the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) – ensuring its members have the highest expertise and that it operates independently of government.

“A strong national curriculum is a foundation of the top performing education systems around the world and a key pillar in the Australian Government’s Students First policy,” Mr Pyne said.

“The Review confirms what all education ministers are hearing from parents and teachers that there’s simply too much to try to learn, and students and teachers are swamped.

“This is an opportunity for my state and territory colleagues to work with me to ensure the curriculum is delivering the outcomes we want for our students.”

Mr Pyne said the final report is a valuable, well researched, and well considered piece of work.

“Professor Wiltshire and Dr Donnelly have been thorough and painstaking in their conduct of this Review,” Mr Pyne said.

“The Australian Government asked them to examine the robustness, independence and balance of the Australian Curriculum. I am pleased to say they took this very seriously.”

Mr Pyne said there had been very strong public interest in the Review, with almost 1600 submissions received.

“These submissions were complemented by consultations with education experts, teacher and parent groups, and by examining international and national research and the review of specific subject area documentation by specialists in those topics,” Mr Pyne said.

“I look forward to working together with my state and territory colleagues to consider and implement the recommendations of the Review,” Mr Pyne said.

The Review and the Government’s response will contribute to the Students First approach focussing on four areas to make a difference to students:

  • teacher quality
  • school autonomy
  • engaging parents in education
  • strengthening the curriculum.

To view the final report or for more information visit: http://www.studentsfirst.gov.au/review-australian-curriculum

Mr Pyne’s Media: 0407 691 050, pynemedia@education.gov.au

For more information

Media Contact: media@education.gov.au
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